How to Remove Rear Bike Wheel – Tips from Expert in 2021


Having a stranded bicycle wheel can leave you stranded; meanwhile, you can resolve the problem if you have all the tools. Are you frightened of any damage to the chain or shifting after removing a “rear wheel,” then don’t worry; a rear bike “wheel removal” is not a complicated process, but you need proper guidelines and attention to do all of this process. By following down steps, you will learn how to remove the rear bike wheel through which anyone can remove the rear bike wheel by itself, so don’t worry about any damage to the chain or shifting. 

How to Remove Rear Bike Wheel: Tools Required

Bike repair stand

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Removing rear wheels:

If you have a bike repair stand, put the bike on the stand; if the stand is not available, then lay down the bike; in this case, the bike chain will remain clean and don’t affect the “rear derailer.”

Detaching the rear wheel: The bike has two types of “brakes”:

  • “Cantilever brakes” or Rim brakes: If the bike has rim brakes, then open the brakes.
  • “Disc brakes”: If the bike has disc brakes, take extreme care because, in case of toppling over, the rear wheel will come out, but it will bend if the rooter is still inside the caliper.

Derailleur Gear: If the bike has derailleur gear, select the smallest combination of the “sprockets” and turn the pedals so the chain drops onto them. Be sure the chain falls onto the “rear cog” and the smallest chainring on the front wheels.

Lose the nuts:

  • Take wrench of the nuts size.
  • Note the distance between the nuts and the fork.
  • It’s unnecessary to take out the nuts from the axle, and it becomes essential when one of its nuts lose and the bike gets punctured.

Remove the rear wheel:

  • Stand behind a back wheel that your head lies in the centerline.
  • Hold the left side of the bike with your left hand.
  • Place the right thumb on the nut and use your fingers to pull the “derailleur position” backward, so it rotates and comes out from the wheel.
  • Pull up the bike off the rear bike wheel. The rear bike wheel will stay on the ground as the bike comes up. If it sticks to the frame, a check may be something blocked inside the path; if nothing is blocked, then its path is narrow for the hub. In this case, give a downward tap with your right fist to get it moving.
  • In this step, by using your right hand, unhook the chain to lift the bike with your left hand.

Axle system:

On an axle system, there may be a derailleur hanger that loses the nuts to drop out. There are a nut and bolt that holds the hanger in the frame. The wheel lies over the hanger bracket on which the axle extended. The removal method is mentioned below:

Remove rear wheel from axle:

Downshift the smallest sprockets:

  • As you want to let the rear wheel “drop out” of the frame as easy as possible, then put it down and see if the wheel strand straight. But if the wheel is stuck, then there is a “tension” between the rear derailleur and interference between the sprocket and jockey wheel, making it more difficult to drop out from the wheel.

Flip the lever: 

  • Flip the “rear lever” into the open position.
  • Engage the back of the lever into the carrier recess.
  • Unwind the thread from the axle.
  • When you feel the side’s clunk is releasing, you can slide the axle out of the wheel.

Let the wheel out: 

  • In this step, pull the body of the rear derailleur backward; in this way, the rear wheel will drop out.
  • If you have a bike with SRAM type 2 derailleur, then depress the lock button and move the arm or derailleur forward to lock it.
  • With the chain slack now, you can pull the rear derailleur backward to make the obstruction-free path for the axle.
  • Now the wheel will out from the frame.

Refitting the rear wheel:

  • This step can be more tricky, as you have to chain up on the sprockets, guide the rotor between the “brake pads” and caliper.
  • Ensure the axle is set off to line up with the frame dropouts.
  • Position the sprocket and chain:
  • Now position the chain on the top of the smallest sprockets and ensure the chain is running below the axle.
  • “Linear Pull” the wheel into place:
    • Now in these steps, bring back the wheel and frame together.
    • You will need to guide the axle with your fingers.
  • Replace the axle:
    • Now reinsert the through-axle.
    • When you gently rotate the axle, it will help the axle to move through the hub.
  • Screw the axle into place:
    • When the axle end touches the dropout, then make sure the lever is open.
    • Make sure it begins to lever to engage the axle and frame threads.
  • Tighten the axle:
    • Tight it enough to stop any movement between the hub and frame and close the lever.
    • “Quick-release lever” should be tightly closed to ensure safety. Learn tighitng bike chain.

How to Remove Rear Bike Wheel: FAQ

How do you take the back wheel off a bike?

Lay down the bike; in this case, the bike chain will remain clean and don’t affect the “rear derailer.”

  • Stand behind a back wheel that your head lies in the centerline.
  • Hold the left side of the bike with your left hand.
  • Place the right thumb on the nut and use your fingers to pull the “derailleur position” backward, so it rotates and comes out from the wheel.
  • Lift the bike off the rear wheel. The rear wheel will stay on the floor or bike stand as the bike comes up. 
  • If it is stuck in the frame, a check may be something blocked inside the path; if nothing is blocked, then its path is narrow for the hub. In this case, give a downward tap with your right fist to get it moving.
  • In this step, by using your right hand, unhook the chain to lift the bike with your left hand.

How do you take the back wheel off a bike without quick release?

Rear wheels usually use 15mm nuts. To remove the back wheel without a quick-release, follow the down steps:

  • First, shift the rear cog.
  • Then open the quick release if it has one nut.
  • If the bike has a center-pull design, then you can undo the yoke cable.
  • The other way to take out the wheel is to lose the air from the tires.
  • In this way, the tire will fit between the brake blocks.
  • If the tire is already narrow enough, then there is no need to do this step.
  • Lose both axle nuts, pull the derailleur out of the dropouts, then push the wheel out of the dropouts; in this way, the wheel will be out from the frame without a quick release.

How do you reattach a rear bike wheel?

  • This step can be a little more maneuver, as you have to chain up on the sprockets, guide the rotor between the “brake pads” and caliper.
  • Ensure the axle is set off to line up with the frame dropouts.
  • Position the sprocket and chain
  • Now position the chain on the top of the smallest sprockets and ensure the chain is running below the axle.
  • “Linear Pull” the wheel into place:
    • Now in these steps, bring back the wheel and frame together.
    • You will need to guide the axle with your fingers.
  • Replace the axle:
    • Now reinsert the through-axle.
    • When you gently rotate the axle, it will help the axle to move through the hub.
  • Screw the axle into place:
    • When the axle end touches the dropout, then make sure the lever is open.
    • Make sure it begins to lever to engage the axle and frame threads.
  • Tighten the axle:
    • Tight it enough to stop any movement between the hub and frame and close the lever.
    • “Quick-release lever” should be tightly closed to ensure safety.

Conclusion

To conclude this topic, if you have an online system in your home, then you can find the best solution with photos. As you see, removing a rear bike wheel is not a complicated process. The only thing that will help is a wrench; if you want quick release, you can lose air from tires or push the “quick break” handle to push the brake in this way; you can lose the nuts and push the lever with your right thumb. There are many methods, but here I also mention removing the rear wheel from the axle.

Robert A. McLean

Robert is the Editorial Director of Easy Trip Guides. He is an enthusiastic outdoorsman with experience in naturalist training, outside experience instruction, and writing, notwithstanding his outdoor side interests like Mountain biking, exploring, and outdoors. He is a tremendous fan of underground rock, launched a few new businesses and business adventures. While investigating the backwoods, He, as a rule, convey under 10 dollars of gear. Long stretches of experience have instructed him to pack light. He appreciates sharing his experiences of backcountry training, educating, and guiding through writing in Easy Trip Guides. He loves biking and riding a motorcycle, and he is doing it since his age was 19. Robert has vast knowledge about road bikes, mountain bikes, hybrid bikes, e-bikes, motorcycles, and its al accessions. At Easy Trip Guides, Robert covers all biking and motorcycling blogs and product reviews.

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